Updated Resources: 2013-2015


May 25, 2015 7:56 pm
Written by Leave your thoughts

In 2013, I curated a Zotero bibliography for the Digital Environmental Humanities Workshop held at McGill University and organized by Professors Posthumus and Sinclair. Since then, a wide variety of articles, blog posts and projects have been published, exploring the emerging field from both micro and macro perspectives. I have recently updated the online bibliography collections to include content published from 2013 to 2015. A bibliography of these new items is included at the end of this blog post.

Included in this bibliography are books from the Routledge Environmental Humanities series. First introduced in 2014, this series aims to portray critical environmental issues and crises through the lens of the Humanities. Similarly to the premise of the Environmental Humanities themselves, books in this series call for moving away from purely scientific approaches to environmental issues and embracing instead an interdisciplinary perspective. To date, the following books have been published:

Frawley, Jodi, and Iain McCalman, eds. Rethinking Invasion Ecologies from the Environmental Humanities. London: Routledge, 2014. Print.
Glotfelty, Cheryll, and Eve Quesnel, eds. The Biosphere and the Bioregion: Essential Writings of Peter Berg. London: Routledge, 2014. Print.
Hamilton, Clive, François Gemenne, and Christophe Bonneuil, eds. The Anthropocene and the Global Environmental Crisis: Rethinking Modernity in a New Epoch. Abingdon: Routledge, 2015. Print.
Muir, Cameron. The Broken Promise of Agricultural Progress: An Environmental History. London: Routledge, 2014. Print.
Syse, Karen Lykke, and Martin Lee Mueller, eds. Sustainable Consumption and the Good Life: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Abingdon: Routledge, 2014. Print.

The online-based Environmental Humanities journal has consistently been publishing assorted thought-provoking articles. The fifth volume introduced a series of articles under the thematic umbrella of a “Living Lexicon for the Environmental Humanities”. Authors explored the significance of words, such as belonging, broken, care and memory, from interdisciplinary angles. These short articles are particularly interesting to consider in contrast with the results of our previous Topic Modeling project.

The ongoing Sawyer Seminar on the Environmental Humanities at UCLA features a thorough overview of the field. The Seminar itself, organized by Ursula Heise, Jon Christensen and Michelle Niemann consisted of monthly discussions and reading groups featuring leading researchers in the Environmental Humanities.

Updated resources for 2013-2015

Anshelm, Jonas, and Anders Hansson. “The Last Chance to Save the Planet? An Analysis of the Geoengineering Advocacy Discourse in the Public Debate.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 101–123. Print.
Athanassakis, Yanoula. Ecocriticism and the Material Turn: Environmental Justice in Contemporary U.S. Narratives. Routledge, 2016. Print.
Bergthaller, Hannes et al. “Mapping Common Ground: Ecocriticism, Environmental History, and the Environmental Humanities.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 261–276. Print.
Bianchi, Melissa. “Rhetoric and Recapture: Theorising Digital Game Ecologies Through EA’s The Sims Series.” Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism 18.3 (2014): 209–220. Print.
Bloomfield, Mandy. “Unsettling Sustainability: The Poetics of Discomfort.” Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism 19.1 (2015): 21–35. Print.
Boes, Tobias. “Beyond Whole Earth: Planetary Mediation and the Anthropocene.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 155–170. Print.
Bristow, Tom. “Memory: Living Lexicon for the Environmental Humanities.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 307–311. Print.
Bristow, Tom, and Thomas Ford, eds. A Cultural History of Climate Change. Routledge, 2015. Print.
Cafaro, Philip, and Ronald Sandler, eds. Virtue Ethics and the Environment. Abingdon: Springer, 2014. Print.
Callaway, Elizabeth. “A Space for Justice: Messianic Time in the Graphs of Climate Change.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 13–33. Print.
Callicott, Baird. “A NeoPresocratic Manifesto.” Environmental Humanities 2.2 (2013): 169–186. Print.
Carey, John et al. Re-Imagining Nature: Environmental Humanities and Ecosemiotics. Ed. Alfred Kentigern Siewers. Lanham: Bucknell University Press, 2013. Print.
Carruth, Allison, and Robert Marzec. “Environmental Visualization in the Anthropocene: Technologies, Aesthetics, Ethics.” Public Culture 26.2 (2014): 205–211. Print.
Castree, Noel. “The Anthropocene and the Environmental Humanities: Extending the Conversation.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 233–260. Print.
Chang, Alenda. “‘Slow Violence’: A Proposal for Ecological Game Studies.” Ant, Spider, Bee. N.p., 27 Jan. 2013. Web. 10 June 2013.
Chen, Cecilia, Janine MacLeod, and Astrida Neimanis. Thinking with Water. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2013. Web. 18 July 2013.
Cunsolo Willox, Ashlee et al. “The Land Enriches the Soul: On Climatic and Environmental Change, Affect, and Emotional Health and Well-Being in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, Canada.” Emotion, Space and Society 6 (2013): 14–24. ScienceDirect. Web. 30 Aug. 2013.
Deloughrey, Elizabeth, Jill Didur, and Anthony Carrigan, eds. Global Ecologies and the Environmental Humanities: Postcolonial Approaches. New York: Routledge, 2015. Print.
Dobrin, Sidney. “Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism.” Frontier 2.0 18.3 (2014): 203–208. Print.
Drenthen, Martin, and Jozef Keulartz, eds. Old World and New World Perspectives in Environmental Philosophy: Transatlantic Conversations. New York: Springer, 2014. Print.
Dyball, Robert, and Barry Newell. Understanding Human Ecology: A Systems Approach to Sustainability. London: Routledge, 2014. Print.
Emmett, Robert, and Frank Zelko. “Minding the Gap: Working Across Disciplines in Environmental Studies.” Rachel Carson Center Perspectives 2 (2014): 1–70. Print.
Frawley, Jodi, and Iain McCalman, eds. Rethinking Invasion Ecologies from the Environmental Humanities. London: Routledge, 2014. Print.
Garrard, Greg, Gary Handwerk, and Sabine Wilke. “Introduction: ‘Imagining Anew: Challenges of Representing the Anthropocene.’” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 149–153. Print.
Giesecke, Annette, and Naomi Jacobs, eds. The Good Gardener? Nature, Humanity, and the Garden. London: Artifice Books, 2015. Print.
Girvan, Anita. “Wii 2 R Ephemera: Archiving Eco-Cultural Morphology.” Ctheory (2013): n. pag. Web. 19 July 2013.
Glotfelty, Cheryll, and Eve Quesnel, eds. The Biosphere and the Bioregion: Essential Writings of Peter Berg. London: Routledge, 2014. Print.
Grebowicz, Margret. “Glacial Time and Lonely Crowds: The Social Effects of Climate Change as Internet Spectacle.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 1–11. Print.
Gustafsson, Tommy, and Pietari Kääpä. Transnational Ecocinema. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013. Print.
Hageman, Andrew. “Signals of Nature, Prestidigital Ecology.” Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism 18.3 (2014): 274–285. Print.
Hagood, Amanda. “Wonders with the Sea: Rachel Carson’s Ecological Aesthetic and the Mid-Century Reader.” Environmental Humanities 2.2 (2013): 57–77. Print.
Hall, Dewey. Romantic Naturalists, Early Environmentalists: An Ecocritical Study, 1789-1912. Farnham: Ashgate Publishing, 2014. Print.
Hall, Marcus, and Patrick Kupper, eds. “Crossing Mountains: The Challenges of Doing Environmental History.” Rachel Carson Center Perspectives 4 (2014): 1–78. Print.
Hamilton, Clive, François Gemenne, and Christophe Bonneuil, eds. The Anthropocene and the Global Environmental Crisis: Rethinking Modernity in a New Epoch. Abingdon: Routledge, 2015. Print.
Heise, Ursula. “Globality, Difference, and the International Turn in Ecocriticism.” PMLA 128.3 (2013): 636–643. Print.
—. “Plasmatic Nature: Environmentalism and Animated Film.” Public Culture 26.2 (2014): 301–318. Print.
Hicks, Scott. “Jane Smiley’s A Thousand Acres (1991) and Archival Reimaginations of Eco-Cosmopolitanism.” Environmental Humanities 2.2 (2013): 1–20. Print.
Houser, Heather. Ecosickness in Contemporary U.S. Fiction: Environment and Affect. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014. Print.
—. “The Aesthetics of Environmental Visualizations: More than Information Ecstasy?” Public Culture 26.2 (2014): 319–337. Print.
Hutchings, Rich. “Understanding of and Vision for the Environmental Humanities.” Environmental Humanities 4 (2014): 213–220. Print.
Isenberg, Andrew, ed. The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Print.
Ivakhiv, Adrian. Ecologies of the Moving Image: Cinema, Affect, Nature. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013. Print.
Jorgensen, Finn Arne. “The Armchair Traveler’s Guide to Digital Environmental Humanities.” Environmental Humanities 4 (2014): 95–112. Print.
Kelsey, Elin, ed. “Beyond Doom and Gloom: An Exploration through Letters.” Rachel Carson Center Perspectives 6 (2014): 1–76. Print.
Kirksey, Eben. “Hope: Living Lexicon for the Environmental Humanities.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 295–300. Print.
Lekan, Thomas. “Fractal Earth: Visualizing the Global Environment in the Anthropocene.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 171–201. Print.
Lestel, Dominique, Jeffrey Bussolini, and Matthew Chrulew. “The Phenomenology of Animal Life.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 125–148. Print.
Levene, Mark. “Climate Blues: Or How Awareness of the Human End Might Re-Instil Ethical Purpose to the Writing of History.” Environmental Humanities 2.2 (2013): 147–167. Print.
Lidström, Susanna. Nature, Environment and Poetry: Ecocriticism and the Poetics of Seamus Heaney and Ted Hughes. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2015. Print.
Lidström, Susanna, and Greg Garrard. “‘Images Adequate to Our Predicament’: Ecology, Environment and Ecopoetics.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 35–53. Print.
Mason, Travis. Ornithologies of Desire- Ecocritical Essays, Avian Poetics and Don McKay. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013. Print.
Mauch, Christof et al., eds. “Making Tracks: Human and Environmental Histories.” Rachel Carson Center Perspectives 5 (2013): 1–138. Print.
Mavhunga, Clapperton, and Helmuth Trischler, eds. “Energy (and) Colonialism, Energy (In)Dependence.” Rachel Carson Center Perspectives 5 (2014): 1–56. Print.
McKim, Kristi. Cinema as Weather: Stylistic Screens and Atmospheric Change. New York: Routledge, 2013. Print.
Meyer, John. Engaging the Everyday: Environmental Social Criticism and the Resonance Dilemma. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2015. Print.
Mickey, Sam. On the Verge of a Planetary Civilization: A Philosophy of Integral Ecology. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014. Print.
—. Whole Earth Thinking and Planetary Coexistence: Ecological Wisdom at the Intersection of Religion, Ecology, and Philosophy. London: Routledge, 2015. Print.
Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Visualizing the Anthropocene.” Public Culture 26.2 (2014): 213–232. Print.
Monteduro, Massimo et al., eds. Law and Agroecology: A Transdisciplinary Dialogue. New York: Springer, 2015. Print.
Mossner, Alexa Weik von. Moving Environments: Affect, Emotion, Ecology, and Film. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2014. Print.
Muir, Cameron. “Broken: Living Lexicon for the Environmental Humanities.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 287–290. Print.
—. The Broken Promise of Agricultural Progress: An Environmental History. London: Routledge, 2014. Print.
Narine, Anil, ed. Eco-Trauma Cinema. New York: Routledge, 2014. Print.
Nye, David et al. “The Emergence of the Environmental Humanities.” May 2013. Web.
O’Gorman, Emily. “Belonging: Living Lexicon for the Environmental Humanities.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 283–286. Print.
“Open Access and the Environmental Humanities.” EH In Conversation. N.p., 5 Oct. 2013. Web.
Parak, Gisela. “Eco-Images: Historical Views and Political Strategies.” Rachel Carson Center Perspectives 1 (2013): 1–90. Print.
Piper, Liza, and Lisa Szabo-Jones. Sustaining the West: Cultural Responses to Western Environments, Past and Present. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2014. Print.
Riggio, Adam. Ecology, Ethics, and the Future of Humanity. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. Print.
Rosol, Christoph. “Trying to Assemble an ‘Anthropocene Curriculum.’” Environmental Humanities. N.p., 16 Mar. 2014. Web.
Rotherham, Ian. Eco-History: An Introduction to Biodiversity and Conservation. Cambridge: White Horse Press, 2014. Print.
Rozzi, Ricardo et al., eds. Earth Stewardship: Linking Ecology and Ethics in Theory and Practice. New York: Springer, 2015. Print.
Rust, Stephen, Salma Monani, and Sean Cubitt, eds. Ecomedia: Key Issues. London: Routledge, 2015. Print.
Schildgen, Brenda. “Reception, Elegy, and Eco-Awareness: Trees in Statius, Boccaccio, and Chaucer.” Comparative Literature 65.1 (2013): 85–100. Print.
Seemann, Kurt, Matthew Parnell, and Dora Marinova. Greening Frankenstein: Innovation for Sustainability. Springer, 2016. Print.
Smith, Mick. “Ecological Community, the Sense of the World, and Senseless Extinction.” Environmental Humanities 2.2 (2013): 21–41. Print.
Spash, Clive. “The Dying Planet Index: Life, Death and Man’s Domination of Nature.” Environmental Values 24 (2015): 1–17. Print.
Squire, Louise, and Matthew Jarvis. “Literature and Sustainability.” Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism 19.1 (2015): 1–7. Print.
SSHRC Storyteller: Anita Girvan. N.p., 2013. Film.
Steiner, Gary. Animals and the Limits of Postmodernism. New York: Columbia University Press, 2013. Print.
Struck, Wolfgang. “Genesis, Retold: In Search of an Atlas of the Anthropocene.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 217–232. Print.
Syse, Karen Lykke, and Martin Lee Mueller, eds. Sustainable Consumption and the Good Life: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Abingdon: Routledge, 2014. Print.
Taylor, Bron. Avatar and Nature Spirituality. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013. Print.
“The Environmental Humanities in a Changing World.” iTunes. N.p., 2013. Web. 10 June 2013.
Trischler, Helmuth. “Anthropocene: Envisioning the Future of the Age of Humans.” Rachel Carson Center Perspectives 3 (2013): 1–76. Print.
Tucker, Mary Evelyn, John Grim, and Willis Jenkins, eds. Routledge Handbook of Religion and Ecology. London: Routledge, 2016. Print.
Van Dooren, Thom. “Care: Living Lexicon for the Environmental Humanities.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 291–294. Print.
Vidal, Fernando, and Nélia Dias, eds. Endangerment, Biodiversity and Culture. London: Routledge, 2015. Print.
Vince, Gaia. Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made. Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2014. Print.
Waage, Fred, Michelle Balaev, and Harold Fromm. “Ecocriticism’s Past and Future.” PMLA 128.3 (2013): 778–781. Print.
Walker, Kenny. “‘Without Evidence, There Is No Answer’: Uncertainty and Scientific Ethos in the Silent Spring[s] of Rachel Carson.” Environmental Humanities 2.2 (2013): 101–116. Print.
Werlen, Benno, ed. Global Sustainability, Cultural Perspectives and Challenges for Transdisciplinary Integrated Research. New York: Springer, 2015. Print.
Westling, Louise, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Literature and the Environment. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Print.
“What Is the Environmental Humanities?” UCLA Sawyer Seminar on the Environmental Humanities. N.p., 2014. Web.
Wright, Kate. “Becoming-With: Living Lexicon for the Environmental Humanities.” Environmental Humanities 5 (2014): 277–281. Print.
Wright, Katherine. Transdisciplinary Journeys in the Anthropocene: More Than Human Encounters. London: Routledge, 2015. Print.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *